Lamborghini Murcielago R-GT

Lamborghini Murcielago R-GTThe Lamborghini Murcielago R-GT is a race-only version of the Murcielago, developed jointly with Reiter Engineering and Audi Sport. It has rear-wheel drive unlike the standard Murcielago to comply with the FIA, ACO, and JAF rules. Lamborghini Murcielago R-GT retains the standard Murcielago V12, but has air restrictors to manage power. Its acceleration and top speed are highly dependent on the gearing selected for a particular race track. In March 2006 at the Super GT Suzuka 500 km, a Murcielago R-GT specifically built for Super GT for the Japanese Lamborghini Owners Club recorded the first win ever for a Murcielago when they earned a win in the GT300 class. In March 2007 in the FIA GT Championship, the All-Inkl.com Racing Murcielago won the Zhuhai 2 Hours. In December 2006, Reiter Engineering tested an upgraded Murcielago R-GT LM, featuring redesigned body work and a new rear wing with less drag.

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Lamborghini Islero

Lamborghini IsleroThe Lamborghini Islero is a sports car produced by Italian automaker Lamborghini between 1968 and 1969. It was the replacement for the 400GT and featured the Lamborghini V12 engine. The car debuted at the 1968 Geneva Auto Show. The Islero (pronounced “eez-LEHR-oh”) was named after a Miura bull that killed famed matador Manuel Rodriguez “Manolete” on August 28, 1947. (Lamborghini also produced a car named the Miura, from 1966 to 1973.) Since Carrozzeria Touring, the company that designed Lamborghini’s chassis, was bankrupt, Carrozzeria Marazzi was the next logical choice as it was funded by Mario Marazzi, an old employee of Touring. The design was essentially a rebody of the 400GT, but the track was altered to allow for wider tires and while the Islero’s body suffered from a lack of proper fit between the panels, its good outward visibility, roomier interior, and much improved soundproofing made it an improvement over previous models. It had a 325 hp (242 kW) 4.0 L V12 engine, a five-speed transmission, fully independent suspension, and disc brakes. Its top speed was rated at 250 km/h (155 mph). Only 125 Isleros were built. An updated Islero, dubbed the Islero S, was released in 1969. The engine in this model was tuned to 350 hp (261 kW), but the torque remained the same. There were quite a few styling changes, including brightwork blind slots on the front fenders, an enlarged hood scoop (which supplied air to the interior of the car, not the engine), slightly flared fendered, tinted windows, round side-marker lights (instead of teardrops on the original), and a fixed section in the door windows. Various other changes included larger brake discs, revised rear suspension and revamped dashboard and interior. The top speed of the S improved to 260 km/h (162 mph). Only 100 examples of the Islero S were built, bringing the production total of the Islero nameplate to 225 cars. Ferruccio Lamborghini himself drove an Islero during that era.

Lamborghini Espada

Lamborghini EspadaThe Lamborghini Espada is a grand tourer which was built by Italian car manufacturer Lamborghini between 1968 and 1978. Based on the Marzal show car, displayed at the 1967 Geneva Auto Show, and the Bertone Pirana, a radically rebodied Jaguar E-type. It was to fill the spot of a true four seat car in Lamborghini’s lineup, which already included the 400GT and Miura. 1217 cars were made, making it the most successful Lamborghini model at the time. The car was designed by Marcello Gandini of Bertone. The name “Espada” means “sword” in Spanish, referring to the sword that bullfighters use to kill the bulls. The Espada was originally fitted with a 4L 325 bhp (242 kW) V12 engine, fully independent suspension and four wheel disc brakes. Most transmissions were manual, and the Espada also introduced one of the first automatic transmissions able to absorb the torque of a large sporting V12. It had unusual gearing, with 3 ratios: drive, 1 and reverse. During its 10 year production the car underwent some changes, and three different models were produced. These were the S1 (1968-1970), the S2 (1970-1972) and the S3 (1972-1978). Each model featured engine power improvements, but only minor details were changed with the exterior design. The interior was altered dramatically between each model. An all new dashboard and steering wheel was installed for the S2, and the interior was again revamped for the S3. In 1970, power assisted steering was offered as an option, and in 1974 an automatic transmission was also offered. In 1975 impact bumpers had to be installed to meet United States safety requirements, and some people consider cars produced with them to be the S4, but Lamborghini did not officially change the designation. Near the end of the Espada’s life, Bertone designed a four door prototype, which was never put into production.

Engine:
3929 cc 60° V12
325 bhp (242 kW)
(1968 – 1970)
3929 cc 60° V12
350 bhp (261 kW)
(1970 – 1978)

Lamborghini 400GT

Lamborghini 400GTThe Lamborghini 400GT 2+2 was a 2+2-seated sports car from the Italian manufacturer Lamborghini, successor to the 350GT. First presented at the 1966 Geneva Auto Show.

Compared to its predecessor the engine was enlarged to 3929 cc (240 c.i.), increasing the power to 320 bhp (239 kW). The 400GT 2+2 was actually a different body from the 350GT, with a longer wheelbase, different roofline, and some sheetmetal changes throughout the car. The larger body shape enabled the +2 seating to be installed in the rear, where the 350GT only had room for luggage or +1 seating. The bodywork was designed by Carrozzeria Touring. The 400GT 2+2 also had a Lamborghini designed gearbox, with Porsche style synchromesh on all gears, which greatly improved the drivetrain.

There was a variant of the 350GT with the 4L V12 fitted to it, which was called the 400GT. Only 23 of these smaller coupes were built, three of which had desirable aluminum bodywork.

A total of 247 units were built from 1966 to 1968, when it was replaced with the Islero. A special, one-off version called the 400GT Monza was built by Neri and Bonacini, who had previously worked on the 350GT.

Lamborghini 350GT

Lamborghini 350GTThe Lamborghini 350GT was the first production car by Lamborghini, first shown at the Turin Motor Show in 1963.

The 350GT’s name is derived from it’s 3.5 litre quad-cam V-12 engine. The 350GT has an independent rear suspension while Ferrari and many other manufacturers still used live rear axles. The 350’s body is a controversial 2+1 semi-fastback design by Carrozzeria Touring of Milan. The 350GT generally drew high praises at the time for its flexible, high-revving engine, its stable cornering on rough and smooth surfaces, and its high level of finish. One hundred twenty were built from 1963 to 1966.

The 350GT has a top speed of 149 mph (240 km/h) and can accelerate to 60 mph (97 km/h) in 6.8 seconds.

Lamborghini 350GTV

Lamborghini 350GTVThe Lamborghini 350 GTV was the prototype and forerunner of the later 350 GT (Lamborghini’s first production model).

It featured a controversial semi-fastback body design by Franco Scaglione and built by Giorgio Neri and Luciano Bonacini, which was modified for series production by Carrozzeria Touring, and Lamborghini’s own 3.5 liter V-12 engine. The car was presented to the public on the 1963 Turin Auto Show.

Lamborghini 350 GTV:
– Body style: 2-door coupe
– Layout : FR coupe
– Engine: 3.5L V12
– Transmission: ZF 5-speed manual