Lamborghini Gallardo

Lamborghini GallardoThe Lamborghini Gallardo is a sports car built by Lamborghini. The Gallardo is Lamborghini’s most-produced model to date, with 5,000 built in the first three years of production. It is less expensive than Lamborghini’s larger, more powerful Murcielago. The car is named after a famous breed of fighting bull. The Spanish word gallardo  translates into gallant. The Gallardo was designed as a competitor to the Ferrari 360, and now competes with its replacement, the Ferrari F430 both of which have V8 engines and develop similar peak power. The Gallardo has a specially developed rear-biased all-wheel drive system which differentiates it from its rear-wheel drive competitors. At current U.S. prices, a 2008 Lamborghini Gallardo coupe costs USD $186,250 – $222,800, while a 2008 Lamborghini Gallardo spyder costs $201,595 – $263,595. The Gallardo is the first and only car to use the Lamborghini V10 engine. The Gallardo offers two choices of transmissions, a conventional (H-Box) six-speed manual transmission, and an advanced six-speed electro-hydraulically controlled ’emi-automatic single-clutch sequential manual, or, as Lamborghini abbreviates it to, E-gear. The latter E-gear allows the driver to make shifts much faster than a manual transmission would, however with this option one sacrifices a certain measure of control that the manual transmission would offer. The driver shifts up and down via paddles behind the steering wheel, and does not need to manually actuate the clutch.

Lamborghini Murcielago

Lamborghini MurcielagoThe Lamborghini Murcielago is a Sports Car produced by Italian automaker Automobili Lamborghini S.p.A. and designed by Luc Donckerwolke. It was introduced in 2002 as the successor to the Diablo. The Murcielago is a two-door, two-seat coupe. To celebrate the company’s 40 years in operation, 50 special edition Murcielagos were built during the autumn of 2003. An open-top version called the Murcielago Roadster was introduced in 2004 for the 2005 model year. The roadster features similar performance to the coupe with a more aggressive rear flank, as well as a considerably higher price tag. The Murcielago sports a 6.2 Liter version of the legendary Lamborghini V12 engine, a six-speed manual or six-speed sequential automatic transmission, and four-wheel drive. It also has a rear spoiler that can be raised to an angle of 70 degrees, side mirrors that fold in to improve aerodynamics, and side scoops that automatically open to the needed size to let in just the right amount of air needed to cool its engine. The 2008 car’s fuel economy is 8 mpg (U.S.) (29 L/100 km) city and 13 mpg (U.S.) (18 L/100 km) freeway, making it the least efficient 2008 car for city driving, according to the EPA. The coupe’s base price is US $313,000, which is US $107,000 more than its smaller sibling, the Lamborghini Gallardo.

Lamborghini Diablo SVR

Lamborghini Diablo SVRUnveiled at the 1996 Geneva Salon, the SVR variant is a lightweight competition version of the SV, built for its pro-am one make series known as Diablo Supertrophy, which was intended to run for three years, with its inaugural round held as the support race to the 1996 24 Hours of Le Mans. The SVR is 191kg less than the SV (1385kg) and boasts 540 hp (403 kW), mainly of a revised fuel injection timing and is the first Diablo to use variable valve timing. There are numerous noticeable cosmetic differences, the covered lights or sometimes is used in place of its usual retractable headlights. Other cosmetic differences includes, a deeper front spoiler, side skirts and a redesigned rear valance. Also the most visible modification is a fully adjustable rear aerofoil, lightweight acrylic side windows is used in place of a glass items and a set of 18-inch OZ Racing one-piece hollow spoke cast magnesium wheels Each car sold, came with a seasons factory support and an entry to the one-make series. All repairs and maintenance was carried out by Lamborghini themselves. The series first title winner was BPR regular, Thomas Bscher, who became involved with the business side of the brand in later years. In total, 31 versions of this model have been produced altogether. Only a few of these have been modified for road use.

Lamborghini Jalpa

Lamborghini JalpaThe Lamborghini Jalpa , pronounced in the Spanish “HAL-pah”, was a car produced by the Italian automaker Lamborghini from 1981 to 1988. The Jalpa was a development of the earlier Silhouette, but was rather more successful; a total of 419 examples were sold. The Jalpa was intended to fill a role as a more “affordable” Lamborghini, being much cheaper than the Countach. Instead of the big car’s V12, the Jalpa was fitted with a transversely-mounted 3.5 litre V8 that developed 255 hp (190 kW). The bodywork was designed and built by Bertone. The name Jalpa came from a famous breed of fighting bulls, Ferruccio Lamborghini having a liking for bulls and being a Taurus he gave most Lamborghini cars bullfighting-related names. Compared to the Countach, the Jalpa was much easier to drive, having better visibility and being more tractable in heavy traffic and at slow speeds. At night, however, there were many distracting internal reflections (a common curse of the Italian low-volume car). Originally the plastic components (bumpers, air intakes and engine cover) were black, and the car carried over the rectangular taillights of the Silhouette. In 1984, however, the plastic became body-colored, and round taillights were fitted. In 1988, after falling sales, the new owners, Chrysler, decided to end Jalpa production. The official top speed of the Jalpa was 146 mph (234 km/h) but higher speeds have been claimed. The weight with all fluids is 3322 lb (1,507 kg). The Jalpa is 43.9 inches (112 cm) tall.

Lamborghini Countach

Lamborghini CountachThe Lamborghini Countach was a mid engined sports car produced by Italian automaker Lamborghini from 1974 to 1990. The design of the Countach popularized, but did not pioneer, the wedge-shaped, sharply angled look popular in many high performance supercars. The “cabin-forward” design concept, which pushes the passenger compartment forward in order to accommodate a larger engine, was also popularized by the Countach. The rear wheels were driven by a traditional Lamborghini V12 engine mounted longitudinally with a mid-engined configuration. For better weight distribution, the engine is pointed ‘backwards’; the output shaft is at the front, and the gearbox is in front of the engine, the driveshaft running back through the engine’s sump to a differential at the rear. Although originally planned as a 5 liter powerplant, the first production cars used the Lamborghini Miura’s 4 liter engine. Later advances increased the displacement to 5 liters and then (in the Quattrovalvole model) 5.2 L with four valves per cylinder. All Lamborghini Countaches were equipped with six Weber carburetors until the arrival of the 5000QV model, at which time the car became available in America, and used Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection. The European models, however, continued to use the carburetors until the arrival of the Lamborghini Diablo, which replaced the legendary Countach.

Lamborghini Urraco

Lamborghini UrracoThe Lamborghini Urraco was a sports car manufactured by Italian automaker Lamborghini in the 1970s. It was introduced at the Turin auto show in 1970 but wasn’t available to buyers until 1973. The car was a 2+2 coupe with body designed by Marcello Gandini, at the time working for Carrozzeria Bertone. Rather than being another supercar, like the Lamborghini Miura, the Urraco was more affordable, an alternative to the pricier Ferrari Dino and Maserati Merak. When production ended in 1979, 791 Urracos had been built. Twenty-one of these were labeled Urraco P111 for the American market. In order to comply with American regulations, these cars had larger front bumpers and less horsepower. The other Urraco versions were the Urraco P200, Urraco P250 and Urraco P300 with 2 litre, 2.5 litre, and 3 litre V-8 respectively. Both the Lamborghini Silhouette, with its detachable roof panel, and its successor Lamborghini Jalpa, with a 3.5 litre V-8 engine, were based upon the Urraco.

Lamborghini Jarama

Lamborghini JaramaLamborghini Jarama is a sports coupe which was built by Lamborghini between 1970 and 1976. It was designed by Bertone designer Marcello Gandini. It was named after the Jarama racing circuit near Madrid, Spain (which is in turn named after the Jarama river). In 1970, Lamborghini had to redesign the Islero to meet new United States safety and emissions regulations. The new car was built on a shortened version of the same platform as the Espada. Two different models were made, the original GT (1970-1973) model having 350 bhp (260 kW) V12, and the GTS (1973-1976) with its output upped to 365 bhp (272 kW). Also, with the GTS there were a few minor body modifications and power assisted steering, removable roof panels, and an automatic transmission became available as options. A total of 327 Jaramas were built.